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Can Summer Reading increase your Child’s Physical and Mental Health?

Can Summer Reading increase your Child’s Physical and Mental Health?

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Did You Know?… Adding a good summer reading list keeps
children’s minds active over the summer and aids in lessening anxiety when returning back to school. As reading skills are developed during the summer, confidence is built for the upcoming school year. When children are asked to read aloud in front of their peers, they will feel comfortable with doing so. Higher self-esteem…

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Can Summer Reading increase your Child’s Physical and Mental Health?

butterfly

Did You Know?… Adding a good summer reading list keeps
children’s minds active over the summer and aids in lessening anxiety when returning back to school. As reading skills are developed during the summer, confidence is built for the upcoming school year. When children are asked to read aloud in front of their peers, they will feel comfortable with doing so. Higher self-esteem levels result in excellent mental health, providing motivation and desire to succeed in the classroom.

Summer reading is also vital in maintaining mental functionality and stamina, because it exercises the brain and strengthens the memory bank. According to the authors of a report from the National Summer Learning Association, “A conservative estimate of lost instructional time is approximately two months or roughly 22 percent of the school year…. It’s common for teachers to spend at least a month re-teaching material that students have forgotten over the summer. That month of re-teaching eliminates a month that could have been spent on teaching new information and skills” (rif.org).

As the memory bank becomes stronger, information that enters the brain starts to become easier to retain and comprehend for children. The ultimate result is that children will be able to achieve higher test scores on assessment tests, as well as earn higher grades in English and reading classes.

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Order Your Books Today!

It Doesn’t Stop There…

Summer reading combined with physical activity adds to children’s overall health. It can provide good physical health for children when parents are active in changing up their scenery during reading time. Parents can walk with their children to local playgrounds and beaches, as well as public libraries to enjoy reading together. Incorporating physical activity into a child’s regimen will be a Screen Shot 2015-07-20 at 1.49.02 PMcatalyst to good mental health. Author, Jannie Pilgrim was inspired to start the “Prince Garrett” series when she began walking with her son, Garrett and telling him creative stories about a prince and his companion Zeus, the dog. “Watching the manifestation of a story come to life from a child’s perspective, is magical,” says Pilgrim. On walks, Pilgrim would point out life’s miracles – the caterpillar that would soon morph into a butterfly. These walks not only created educational value and exercise, it provided bonding and a deep appreciation for nature. “Regular physical activity can help sharpen thinking, learning, and judgment skills. It can also reduce risk of depression and may help improve sleep.” (cdc.gov).

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Add Value to Your Child’s Summer Reading List…

  • Pilgrim’s latest book, “How the Moth Turned into a Butterfly,” is the fourth book in the “Prince Garrett” series. It is impactful because it entails easy-to-comprehend language and intriguing climaxes that persuades children to read. Fun and adventure combined with these elements strives to raise reading levels.
  • The series will expand children’s vocabulary and pronunciation, ultimately strengthening verbal and written communication skills. As a result, they will become more confident when communicating with peers, as well as adults.

Summer readers can purchase a copy of their very own book from the “Prince Garrett” Series  at www.amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com! Visit princegarrett.com for more information on the series.

About the Author

Jannie Pilgrim is the founder of The Deal, LLC, a career consulting firm that provides transformative coaching to aid individuals in their pursuit of personal and career goals.

Jannie holds a Master’s of Science in Human Resources and a postgraduate degree in Training and Development from the Milano Graduate School of The New School University. Jannie has over 15 years of experience in Human Resources, project management, talent acquisition and training development for Fortune 500 companies.

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Tips for getting your kids to read more

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There are a million good reasons to get your kids to read more.  The challenge however, is actually getting them to do it.

“Reading is one of those things that actually improves kids’ academic success in all subjects,” said Caroline Knorr, parenting editor for Common Sense Media.

 

The world is very different from the one children grew up in 30 years ago, with more distractions and arguably more homework vying for children’s attention.

Want to get your child to read more? Here are some tips:

Keep books in your home: Having books easily accessible is the first step in getting your child to read more. That includes both print books and e-books. According to Common Sense Media, recent studies say more than half of U.S. kids are reading digital books at least once a week.

 

Set aside time to read: According to the report, among children who are frequent readers, 57% of parents set aside time each day for their child to read, compared to 16% of parents of children who are infrequent readers.

 

Read yourself: By modeling good behavior, parents can encourage their own kids to read. “You’ve got to walk the walk,”!

 

Help kids connect: If you can find a story line that your child may relate to, in anything from classics to graphic novels to bilingual books, that may encourage them to read more. Kids will read what they’re interested in.

 

Tie in movies, music or video games:  If you plan on watching a movie, playing a video game, or listening to music that’s tied to a book –  have them read the books first — if they haven’t already. “You can then talk about the movie, music or game.  Ask them what they think.  Get their opinions.   A great source is Prince Garrett Reading Tool Kit.  Children can continue to connect reading the books by playing the FREE video Game, music, and the books.

 

Encourage “pocket reading”: There are forms of reading beyond books that can be of value. “If a full book is too daunting for your kid and they’re not going to read – look information that they are interested in and read it on line or print out the information and you can read it together.

 

Source of most information is from : Meredith Deliso